Did you know…

(For the benefit of my students – past, present, and future – and all administrators)

  • MortarboardThat instructors in higher (post-secondary) education have something called “academic freedom“?  That this applies to full-time, part-time, temporary, contingent, tenured, and non-tenured faculty? The 1940 Statement of Principles on Academic Freedom and Tenure, jointly written by the American Association of University Professors and the Association of American Colleges and Universities, recognized that “teachers,” whether tenured or not, “are entitled to freedom in the classroom in discussing their subject.” More recently, judges and juries have recognized that right, too.
  • That academic freedom in higher education includes the right (and responsibility) of an instructor to challenge students – meaning, to expect more of students than they expect of themselves?
  • That academic freedom in higher education includes the right (and responsibility) of an instructor to grade according to professional standards – meaning, to give students the grades they deserve, not the grades they want?
  • That in higher education the students’ grades are a measure of their performance, and not a measure of the instructor’s ability to teach – meaning, that if the student gets an “A”, the student gets the credit and if the student gets an “F”, the instructor does not get the blame?
  • That attending an institution of higher learning is a privilege, and not a right?

Think about it…

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